Our Picks from The Toronto Film Festival

Anne

The Toronto Film Festival kicks off next week, premiering an exciting lineup of upcoming releases. Here are the ones we can’t wait to see:

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Bright Star: Abbie Cornish is Fanny Brawne– muse of the tragic, Romantic poet John Keats— in a role that may have Cornish rise above the swirl of gossip that potentially maims a Hollywood career. We’re excited for Cornish to finally have her moment–one that doesn’t involve the word home-wrecker, that is– and are interested to see if she can carry a film. Cornish portrays a strong-willed Fanny Brawne, inspiration Keats, played by Ben Whishaw. Directed by Jane Campion (The Piano), this historical romance reveals their tender, doomed relationship. Sure to appeal to literary types and dreamy lovers alike.

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Capitalism: A Love Story: Surviving an economy as dismal as this is hard enough, much less trying to comprehend the convoluted events that made things this way. Michael Moore, once again, takes on a complicated and controversial issue, clarifying the issues in his clear, humorous, and deeply upsetting way. Capitalism reveals the gross complexity leading up to the worldwide financial crisis, and looks at the shift between the Bush and the Obama Administrations. Like the Cliff Notes of World Issues, this “shock-umentary” will explain just what the hell is going on.

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An Education: Adorable Carey Mulligan stars with Peter Saarsgard in this coming-of-age tale set in the suburbs of 1960s London. Mulligan is the fresh-faced, wide-eyed Jenny, a 16-year-old who gets swept into the dazzling, very adult world that Saarsgard’s David lives in. The story sounds compelling, and we’re sure the ‘60s British fashions, smoky bars, and glittery parties will be major eye-candy. Besides, we’ve never been able to resist an indie coming-of-ages flick.

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Agora: Rachel Weisz takes her otherworldly beauty to Alexandria, Egypt, 391 A.D., where she tackles the loaded role of Hypatia of Alexandria, a progressive atheist female (yes, all three), who is fighting religious persecution in Roman Egypt. Like Troy and Alexander, the costumes of this historical drama make us swoon. And we love seeing movies that educate and entertain simultaneously.

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Whip It: The basic premise of this movie is already funny: Ellen Page roller-skating. Now, isn’t that enough to make you want to see it? Drew Barrymore‘s directoral debut stars dry-humor-darling Ellen Page as a defiant Texan teen who trades the glamorous world beauty pageants for…roller derby! Ellen Page on wheels, plus throw in Kristen Wigg, Jimmy Fallon and Arrested Development‘s Alia Shawkat, and this is bound to be one of the funniest movies of the year.

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