Are Mall Stores Back? These 2010s Brands Are Reinventing Themselves In 2022

Are Mall Stores Back? These 2010s Brands Are Reinventing Themselves In 2022
Photo: Courtesy of American Eagle.

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If you’ve been anywhere on the internet over the past year or so, you’ve undoubtedly noticed a rising fascination with the early aughts. From butterfly motifs to micro-minis, these ’00s staples have basically taken over the trend-driven fashion scene. But now, there’s a new (old) era quietly on the rebound: the 2010s.

Yep, you read that right—in reality, they weren’t actually that long ago, yet our way of life has drastically changed since then. I mean, this was when TikTok was better known as Musical.ly, and shopping IRL at the mall was consistently on the weekend agenda. After a life-altering two years, a return to light-hearted fashion of decades past has undoubtedly been a welcomed notion.

And for the brands that ruled the 2010s, this has been top-of-mind when deciding how to execute that same 2010s ease in a way that relates to current-day fashion. “I think the nostalgia factor is a big part of why these decades resonate with our customers,” says Kristin Scott, Global Brand President at Abercrombie & Fitch Co in regards to their portfolio of brands like Hollister and Gilly Hicks.

In the midst of such a crazy world, these time periods evoke feelings of simpler, lighter times that they want to grasp onto,” Scott tell STYLECASTER.

Yet, a key factor for success in the 2020s versus the 2010s is having a value-driven mission in addition to covetable fashion. For Hollister, this has been a priority in updating their brand ethos. “We’re interpreting our brand purpose, which is to liberate the spirit of an endless summer inside everyone, ensuring everything we create celebrates individuality and makes our customer feel comfortable and confident in their own skin,” says Scott.

An expansion in inclusive messaging can also be seen when looking at Victoria’s Secret, although it’s unclear whether these brands will actually expand sizing or remain all talk. So, while we’re thrilled for the novelty of carefree style to make a comeback, it’s critical for the cult-classic mall stores of the era to adhere to our values-driven way of life, too.

Ahead, discover how your favorite brands of the 2010s are evolving into the new age—while bringing their beloved nostalgia with them.

UGG

UGGs were the obvious choice for every 2010s It Girl seeking a comfort-driven yet fashionable footwear option. While sneakers undeniably stole our hearts over the last few years, UGG is back to being top-of-mind thanks to pandemic-induced lifestyle shifts (Read: we want to be comfortable at all times!) Taking full advantage of the buzz, UGG has innovated past their classic boots to include variations on sandals and handbags in their assortment, as well as collaborations with other of-the-moment brands (Hello, Telfar!).

STYLECASTER | Y2K Brands

Courtesy of UGG.


 

American Eagle

It’s safe to say that American Eagle is eager to innovate in the new age. Known as the go-to source for denim in the 2010s, they’ve now launched a sustainable line of jeans titled AE77. Plus, they’ve partnered with social It Girls like Addison Rae and Madison Bailey, making it known that they’re ready to take risks that feel important to next-gen shoppers in the 2020s.

STYLECASTER | Y2K Brands

Courtesy of American Eagle.


 

Coach

Who didn’t have a logo Coach bag in the 2010s? While Coach still offers all-over logo options, their most buzzed about styles at the moment include a less-is-more approach and loads of leather. For instance, the viral Pillow Tabby is undeniably an It Bag of the decade, and other trending options include whimsical patchwork, quilting and elegant hardware.

STYLECASTER | Y2K Brands

Courtesy of Coach.


 

Victoria’s Secret

After nixing the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show and enduring leadership shifts over the last couple of years, Victoria’s Secret is working hard to reintroduce itself. Most notably, the retailer has announced the VS Collective as a replacement to their Angels which consists of inspiring “partners” like Paloma Elsesser, Naomi Osaka, Bella Hadid and Adut Akech. At the same time, they’re still releasing loads of dreamy lingerie, sleepwear, activewear and more.

STYLECASTER | Y2K Brands

Courtesy of Victoria’s Secret.


 

Hollister

Hollister brought “California cool” to everyone’s wardrobe through laid-back style with a flirtatious edge––and, of course, they were known for their logo tees and sweats. Now, you can find leather and shearling jackets, a slew of denim outside the limitations of skinny jeans, and sweat sets that may still include some logos, but in a more creative, nonchalant way. Plus, they’ve partnered with TikTok stars Charli and Dixie D’Amelio to launch Social Tourist, which includes unisex options.

STYLECASTER | Lisa Says Gah Nordstrom

Courtesy of Social Tourist.


 

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