Domain Name Debacles: Don’t Let It Happen to You

Jake

Shakespeare once famously asked the question, “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose/By any other name would smell as sweet.” Well no offense to Billy, but when it comes to the internet his romantic logic doesn’t really apply: technically speaking, a website like rose.com is a whole lot sweeter than its seemingly similar compadres rosepage.com, myrose.com, rose.us, and the like. In our increasingly digital world, domain name politics has greatly complicated an otherwise quite friendly blogosphere. Personal style bloggers can fill their pages with as much mind-blowingly creative content as they can generate, but one cannot disregard the importance of a good domain name.

Recently we came across a number of blog posts covering an ongoing tiff between established personal style blogger Jenine Jacobs, owner of the trademarked the-coveted.com, and the owners of the more recently launched thecoveted.com, a website offering viewers an inside look at some of the fashion world’s most… well… coveted closets. While we remain respectfully neutral on this instance in particular, we’d like to remind our readers of a few simple tips to both keep the peace and help drive some traffic towards their own blogs.

  • Before you start your blog, do your research. Regardless of what sort of funding you have, conflicts like these can be easily avoided by sticking with a notably original name. Portmanteaus and compound words are often good options. We really like the sound of something like… oh, StyleCaster, for instance.
  • Consider search engine optimization, or SEO as the kids are calling it. SEO basically determines how high up your page will show up on any given search (and therefore how many people will see it and click), and one way of ensuring more hits is with a memorable domain name andstrategically written titles.
  • Theoretically speaking, any component of a domain name can be as long as up to 256 characters, but that doesn’t mean you should run out and register “GurlsWhoWerkLewksThatAreHawt.com” (now available for $11.99/year!). Not only is such a domain name really annoying and ultimately really dated, but it’s hard to remember and will negatively affect your word-of-mouth publicity. In short, size matters, and on the internet less is more.

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