The Sweater Brands That Will Keep You Feeling Warm and Fuzzy All Winter Long

123 Shares
The Sweater Brands That Will Keep You Feeling Warm and Fuzzy All Winter Long
20 Start slideshow
Photo: Augden/STYLECASTER

Knitwear is by nature a feel-good part of any wardrobe—just think of your cuddliest oversize pullover or that cashmere turtleneck you bought to get you through winter at your first grown-up office job. But unless you have a grandma sending you a freshly-knit sweater every year for the holidays, it’s not necessarily the most personal, and in the age of under-$100 Uniqlo cashmere, it’s easy to miss the hand-made touch—not to mention the real durability—of a high-quality knit.

MORE: 21 Pairs of Slippers You’ll Never Want to Take Off

However, there are a few brands right now that are laser-focused on doing knitwear really, really well—and not just in the sense of hitting the right trends. They’re globally-minded, with a shared aim of bettering the communities from which they source their materials and manufacture their goods, and they value sustainability and ethical production as highly as they value finding the perfect shade of cream for their fisherman sweaters.

MORE: The Best Tights Ever, According to 7 STYLECASTER Editors

Below, get to know—and shop—four unmissable knitwear brands making turtlenecks, cardigans, scarves, and more that you’ll want to curl up in till 2017.

0 Thoughts?
1 of 20
Augden
Augden

We're suckers for a heritage story—especially if it's accompanied by an actually-exceptional brand. Franceska Earls launched her line of hand-made knitwear after traveling to her mother's home country of Bolivia, and seeing an opportunity to bring the talent of the local artisans to the global market, while empowering the women to better provide for their families. Today, Augden has been going strong for six years, with the founder helming design operations in New York and her parents co-managing the day-to-day production in La Paz, the Bolivian administrative capital high in the Andes. The sweaters—easy cableknit pullovers, perfect cropped turtlenecks, slouchy marled tunics—and winter accessories are knit from local Alpaca fiber, making them as sustainable as they are supersoft. And as an added touch for Fall 2016, each garment is named after the artisan who made it, a tribute to "los manos de los angeles," or the "hands of angels," as the company calls its craftswomen.

Lourdes Pullover, $398; at Augden

Photo: Augden
Augden
Augden

Marta Crop Turtleneck, $398; at Augden

Photo: Augden
Augden
Augden

Rocio Headband, $88; at Augden

Photo: Augden
Augden
Augden

Felicita Crop Cardi, $398; at Augden

Photo: Augden
Augden
Augden

Anita Boyfriend Turtleneck, $398; at Augden

Photo: Augden
Naadam
Naadam

If ever you find yourself with a question about Mongolian goat herders or the finer points of cashmere's commodity price, Naadam founder Matt Scanlan is a good guy to ask. Along with business partner Diederik Rijsemus and co-founder Hadas Saar, he launched the brand in 2010 with the goal of improving the cashmere supply chain from the bottom up, bettering conditions for herders, and cutting out middlemen who would typically offer them low prices, take high margins, and drive up the price of the final product. The result? High-quality knits that'll last, both in classic neutrals and seasonal colors like mustard yellow and blush pink.

Eterna Cashmere Rib Crewneck, $225; at Naadam

Photo: Naadam
Naadam
Naadam

Anima Cashmere Mockneck, $199; at Naadam

Photo: Naadam
Naadam
Naadam

Surmount Cashmere Crewneck, $199; at Naadam

Photo: Naadam
Naadam
Naadam

Thayer Cashmere Travel Wrap, $250; at Naadam

Photo: Naadam
Naadam
Naadam

Claudette Cotton Cashmere T-Shirt, $75; at Naadam

Photo: Naadam
Kordal
Kordal

This Brooklyn-based brand has a knack for making pieces that look thoroughly modern without being the least bit trendy (read: disposable). Founder Mandy Kordal had sustainability in mind when she launched the line three years ago, and still makes it a major tenet of its mission. 80 percent of the pieces, which range from cropped jumpsuits to luxurious knit socks, are made in the U.S.A., with the remainder produced by a women's cooperative in Lima, Peru.

Celeste Cardigan, $330; at Kordal

Photo: Kordal
Kordal
Kordal

Isabel Pant, $268; at Kordal

Photo: Kordal
Kordal
Kordal

Anna Sweater, $215; at Kordal

Photo: Kordal
Kordal
Kordal

Cleo Sweater, $280; at Kordal

Photo: Kordal
Kordal
Kordal

Nora Scarf, $217; at Kordal

Photo: Kordal
Siizu
Siizu

While this sustainably-focused newcomer also offers woven pieces in organic cotton and silk, its knitwear is particularly enticing. Made from cashmere sourced from inner Mongolia and machine-washable Italian merino wool, the sweaters hit the sweet spot between cozy and cool. Plus, for those who appreciate Everlane levels of transparency, they lay out the details of their fabrics and factories online so you can do your research before commiting to a purchase.

Vina Turtleneck Sweater, $90; at Siizu

Photo: Siizu
Siizu
Siizu

The Crewneck Merino Sweater, $105; at Siizu

Photo: Siizu
Siizu
Siizu

Innana Cashmere Sweater, $105; at Siizu

Photo: Siizu
Siizu
Siizu

Munin Sleeveless Sweater, $55; at Siizu

Photo: Siizu
Siizu
Siizu

Vina Turtleneck Sweater, $90; at Siizu

Photo: Siizu

Next slideshow starts in 10s

18 Fresh Ways to Wear All-White This Winter

18 Fresh Ways to Wear
All-White This Winter
  • Augden
  • Augden
  • Augden
  • Augden
  • Augden
  • Naadam
  • Naadam
  • Naadam
  • Naadam
  • Naadam
  • Kordal
  • Kordal
  • Kordal
  • Kordal
  • Kordal
  • Siizu
  • Siizu
  • Siizu
  • Siizu
  • Siizu

Promoted Stories

share