The Weird Ways People Deal with Daylight Saving Time Ending

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Daylight savings study
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The end of daylight saving time—happening this Sunday, November 6—is the actual worst. It was observed nationally during World War II to “adjust daylight hours to a time when most people are awake and about,” according to National Geographic, which reports that it has the ability to cut down on car accidents and crime. Still, it seems like a stretch to claim that it’s beneficial to have the sun rise and set an hour later in the winter. I mean, it’s hard enough to peel ourselves out of bed on winter mornings knowing the frigidity that awaits, but add total and complete darkness to that and it’s nearly impossible.

I’m not alone in my daylight saving (and ending) dread: In a new survey of 1,100 Americans by The Finally Light Bulb Company, 49 percent of people said they don’t like losing an hour of daylight. (No shit!) 63 percent also feel sleepier and 25 percent feel more lethargic after the clocks turn back. Double ugh.

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Cozy Fireplace

The Classy Home

It seems we all have our own ways of coping with the negative side effects of daylight saving time—and its end. Other than staying in bed an hour later—pretty much the only silver lining I can think of about turning the clocks back—it seems Americans’ favorite distraction is watching TV (59 percent say that’s their go-to). Understandable: A “Revenge” or “Scandal” marathon is one no-fail way to make staying indoors more appealing. 40 percent decorate for the holidays to pick up their moods; 34 percent read a book; 36 percent build “cozy fires“; and 17 percent have a glass of wine (shout-out to New Yorkers, who got the high score on this one).

Some people resort to more proactive, wellness-oriented solutions. 18 percent of Americans say their pick-me-up is a good workout. (Impressive.) 24 percent cook a favorite meal; 17 percent rearrange the furniture; 13 percent take a bubble bath; and 4 percent call their therapists… All commendable and constructive ways to deal with the misery induced by the end of daylight saving. You can also try my personal favorite: Reading and drinking wine while in the bath—because sometimes you need a multitasking triple-threat of feel-good fun to deal with the daylight saving blues.

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